Would a Respected Mentor Sell a Shady Potion?

01.28.2016

For thousands of years, humans have been subjected to promise-makers offering up visions of a better and longer life. Whether it was the proverbial snake oil salesman peddling his wares on the American prairies or nomadic caravans traversing Europe selling potions and telling fortunes, there has always been an audience eager to believe the pitch and buy their products—no matter how ridiculous their claims may have been.

Today is no different. Despite education, modern technology and medical science, we still want to believe in something that is quick, simple and powerful to lose weight, build muscle, increase stamina, grow hair, tighten aging skin, or make millions of dollars. You can bet that 20 years from now, people will still be buying the latest “breakthrough.” Over and over again this pattern of storytelling repeats.

But common sense dictates that we should take responsibility for making sound decisions in pursuing success, however we define it. For wealth, it suggests allocating assets across a wide spectrum of economic enterprises and hedging the inevitable risks associated with those allocations. A big component of this is having a reputable and trustworthy mentor to rely on and confide in.

Life’s hard decisions require work, discipline and, most importantly, good advice. The right mentor should be able to demonstrate these eternal principles, as well as the evolutionary inclination to adapt as experience dictates. Whether it is a lawyer, a financial advisor, a doctor, an insurance advisor or even where we place our spiritual faith, these choices will determine our physical, spiritual and financial welfare, as we pursue lasting happiness.

A mentor can easily be differentiated from a fraud offering quick fixes. A mentor’s advice is rarely simple, expedient or easy. In fact, sound advice requires wisdom, perseverance and a steady eye on reality. The world will always tempt us with stories and pitches implying that experience and hard work aren’t necessary: “Just do this one easy trick and it will quickly solve all of your issues.” The best antidote to this temptation is to consult with a trustworthy mentor for help in making realistic decisions that keep your best interests in mind.

Frank Muller

As CEO of Provasi Capital Partners, Frank Muller brings nearly 30 years of experience in building and managing multi-channel distribution services. Frank has been a featured contributor in numerous industry publications, bringing his unique insights and perspectives to relevant issues impacting financial advisors and their clients.

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Frank Muller
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